My Blog

Posts for: May, 2019

By Western Slope Dental Center
May 28, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: Root canal  

How a Root Canal Can Help Your Smile


Do you need a root canal? Your teeth are meant to last a lifetime. Years ago, injured or diseased teeth were usually removed. But today, teeth can often be saved with root canal treatment. A root canal is a treatment to fix and save teeth that are badly damaged or infected. Led by Dr. Brandon Berguin, Dr. Kira Funderburk, and Dr. William Berguin, Western Slope Dental Center (located in Grand Junction, CO) offers root canal treatments to the patients they serve. Keep reading to find out how a root canal can help your smile.


1. It can stop the infection. The tooth is infected and dying; root canal treatment stops the infection. While teeth are hard on the outside, the inner pulp is made of soft tissue. This tissue sometimes becomes infected (through cracks in the tooth, deep decay, etc.), and starts to die. Once that happens, a root canal is needed right away — eliminate the pain, control the infection and keep it from spreading.


2. It can eliminate your pain. A toothache is a sign that you may need a root canal. Tooth pain is caused by the infection in the tooth. The pain can be mild or it may be severe. A root canal will relieve your discomfort and improve your well-being. The procedure does not cause pain; it relieves it. With modern technologies and anesthetics, root canal therapy is no more uncomfortable than having a dental filling placed.


3. It can save your smile. Tooth removal is not a good alternative to root canal treatment. Saving your tooth is the best option. The absence of teeth can ruin your smile, cause the surrounding teeth to shift out of place, and affect your ability to chew food. It can also cause speech problems, bone loss, and facial sagging. A root-canal-treated tooth can last for decades, if not a lifetime.


4. It can restore tooth function. A tooth that requires a root canal often is one that has extensive decay. Therefore, a dental crown needs to be placed on the tooth to protect it and restore it to full function. Dental crowns are known for their exceptional durability and great strength. A dental crown will strengthen your tooth and protect it from damage. It can also help you chew better and improve your clarity of speech.

5. It can prevent complications. Don't put off root canal treatment if you need it. Left untreated, bacteria from the infected pulp can travel through the roots of the tooth and into the tissue of the gums and jaw. That can cause a painful abscess to form, which will require urgent treatment.


Healthy smiles are the happiest smiles! Call Western Slope Dental Center at 970-241-3483 right now to schedule an appointment for root canal treatment in Grand Junction, CO. We want all our patients to have healthy, beautiful smiles. You will experience exemplary service and state-of-the-art care at Western Slope Dental Center!


By Western Slope Dental Center
May 25, 2019
Category: Dental Procedures
Tags: chipped teeth   bonding  
BondingwithCompositeResinsIdealforRestoringChippedTeeth

Accidents can happen to your mouth, especially if you have an active lifestyle. For example, a sudden blow to the jaw while playing sports or exercising could result in a chipped tooth. And, while the internal tooth structure may be fine, the effect on your appearance can be disheartening.

Fortunately, we have techniques and materials to restore your smile after an injury. Bonding with composite resin is one such procedure: it’s ideal for mild to moderate chipping, especially in highly visible front teeth.

Composite resin is a dental material made of various substances mixed to match the color and texture of natural teeth. The composite is usually made of inorganic glass filler blended with a plastic-based matrix and joined together with a chemical “coupling” agent. The ratio of filler to matrix will depend on the type of tooth and damage — for example, back teeth, which encounter higher biting forces, require a composite with more filler for added strength.

To begin the procedure, we first prepare the damaged tooth by applying microscopic etchings (often with a chemical solution) that create tiny depressions or “undercuts”: these help create a seamless bond between the composite and the natural tooth. We then apply the composite in layers with a bonding agent, building up layer upon layer until we’ve achieved the desired shape for the tooth involved.

Bonding with composite resins doesn’t require much tooth preparation, can be placed quickly and is relatively inexpensive. Because of the wide spectrum of color possibilities, composite resins are superior to traditional amalgam (metal) restorations in creating a more life-like appearance. Its application, however, can be limited by the amount of tooth structure needing to be replaced: because it isn’t as strong as the tooth structure it replaces, the more tooth structure the bonded composite resin attempts to replace the less likely it can stand up over time to normal bite forces.

Still, composite resins are ideal for mild to moderate damage or disfigurement. If you’ve suffered such an injury, be sure to visit us to see if bonding with life-like composites is the right solution for restoring your smile.

If you would like more information on bonding with composite resins, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “Repairing Chipped Teeth.”


By Western Slope Dental Center
May 15, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: Oral Hygiene  
ProperBrushingandFlossingRemovesDisease-CausingPlaque

You've been brushing your teeth since you were big enough to look over the bathroom sink: now you brush and floss every day. You do it because you know it's important — but do you know why?

It's because your teeth and gums have enemies: oral bacteria in particular, the major cause for tooth decay and periodontal (gum) disease. The vehicle for these infections is a thin-film of food particles on tooth surfaces called plaque.

Daily brushing removes plaque from broad tooth surfaces, while flossing removes it from between teeth. If you don't brush or floss every day — or you aren't effective enough — then plaque becomes a haven for bacteria which then produce high levels of acid that soften and erode enamel. Bacterial plaque can also trigger gum disease: gingivitis (inflamed gum tissues) can begin in just a few days of not brushing and flossing.

You could avoid these diseases and their high treatment costs with an effective, daily hygiene regimen. There are things you can start doing right now to improve your efforts: be sure to hold your toothbrush (soft, multi-tufted is best for most people) at a 45-degree angle to the gum line and gently scrub or wiggle the bristles across the teeth; cover all tooth surfaces on both sides of the teeth — about two minutes of brushing. Be sure to use a fluoride toothpaste to boost enamel strength and don't apply too much pressure when you brush to avoid damaging your gums.

With flossing it's best to hold a small amount of string between fingers from each hand and work it gently between the gaps of each tooth. You then wrap the floss around each tooth in the form of a “C” and gently move up and down three or four times.

You can check to see if you're performing these tasks adequately by running your tongue across your teeth — they should feel smooth and a little squeaky. The real test, though, is during your next checkup. Hopefully we'll find the hygiene habits you've been practicing your whole life are helping you keep your teeth healthy and disease-free.

If you would like more information on best oral hygiene practices, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation.


By Western Slope Dental Center
May 05, 2019
Category: Oral Health
Tags: oral health   GERD  
DontLetGERDRuinYourTeethsHealth

Gastroesophageal reflux disease (GERD) is a digestive disorder that can lead to a number of serious health problems. One of them, tooth erosion, could ruin your dental health.

Your stomach uses strong acids to break down food during digestion. A ring of muscle just above the stomach called the esophageal sphincter works as a one-way valve to allow food contents into the stomach but prevent acid from traveling back up through the esophagus.

GERD occurs when the esophageal sphincter weakens and starts allowing acid into the esophagus and potentially the mouth. The acid wash can eventually damage the esophageal lining, causing pain, heartburn, ulcers or even pre-cancerous cells.

Acid coming up in the mouth can cause the mouth’s normally neutral pH to slide into the acidic range. Eventually, these high acid levels soften and erode tooth enamel, increasing the risk of decay and tooth loss.

Accelerated erosion is often a sign of GERD—in fact, dentists may sound the first warning that a patient has a gastrointestinal problem. Unfortunately, a lot of damage could have already occurred, so it’s important to take steps to protect your teeth.

If you’ve been diagnosed with GERD, be sure to maintain good oral hygiene practices like brushing or flossing, especially using fluoride toothpaste to strengthen enamel. But try not to brush right after you eat or during a GERD episode: your teeth can be in a softened condition and you may actually brush away tiny particles of mineral. Instead, wait about an hour after eating or after symptoms die down.

In the meantime, try to stimulate saliva production for better acid neutralization by chewing xylitol gum or using a saliva booster. You can also lower mouth acid by rinsing with a cup of water with a half teaspoon of baking soda dissolved in or chewing on an antacid tablet.

You can also minimize GERD symptoms with medication, as well as avoiding alcohol, caffeine or spicy and acidic foods. Try eating smaller meals, finishing at least three hours before bedtime, and avoid lying down immediately after eating. Quitting smoking and losing weight may also minimize GERD symptoms.

GERD definitely has the potential to harm your teeth. But keeping the condition under control will minimize that threat and benefit your health overall.

If you would like more information on the effects of GERD on dental health, please contact us or schedule an appointment for a consultation. You can also learn more about this topic by reading the Dear Doctor magazine article “GERD and Oral Health.”